Category Archives: Jewish Law & Life Cycle

Why Bow Left and Right at the End of Amidah?

This weekend we complete the yearly cycle of Torah readings with the final parasha, V’Zot HaBerakhah. Here we read Moses’ last words to the nation before his passing, starting with a blessing for each tribe of Israel. The prologue to the blessings introduces God as coming for Israel “from Sinai, and arising from Seir unto them. He shined forth from Mount Paran, and He came with holy myriads at His right, [to give] a fiery law to His people.” (Deuteronomy 33:2) The Sages use this verse as one of the supports for the practice of taking three steps back and bowing to each side when concluding the Amidah prayer. What is the connection between the two, and why do we take three steps and bow, anyway? Continue reading

Onkelos and the Issue of Translating the Torah

This week we begin reading the fifth and final book of the Torah, Devarim, relayed by Moses over the final 37 days of his life. During this time, Moses “undertook to explain this Torah” (Deuteronomy 1:5) that he left for his people. Rashi comments here by citing the Midrash that Moses translated the Torah into all seventy ancient languages. Why did he do this? Continue reading

Hidden Symbolism of the Mishkan and the 39 Melakhot of Shabbat

A Modern Replica of the Mishkan in Timna, Israel

This week we read a double parasha, Vayak’hel-Pekudei, which focuses on the construction of the Mishkan, the mobile Tabernacle that served as the Israelites’ Temple in the Wilderness (and for centuries afterwards). The parasha begins with the command to observe the Sabbath: “Six days work may be done, but on the seventh day you shall have sanctity, a day of complete rest to God…” (Exodus 35:2) Immediately following this command is the instruction for the Israelites to gather materials for the construction of the Mishkan and its vessels, for “every wise-hearted person among you shall come and make everything that God has commanded.” (Exodus 35:10)

This juxtaposition classically alludes to the fact that the types of actions and works forbidden on Shabbat are those specifically used in constructing and maintaining the Mishkan. The Mishnah (Shabbat 7:2) lists 39 such actions:

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